Adult Social Care Torbay workforce data is available from Skills for Care National Minimum Data Set for Social Care. This is data from participating providers, so is a sample or percentage of the whole workforce.

Torbay reports can be downloaded by anyone at any time. October 2016 highlights and key points are that:

  • Torbay is in line with the national situation, which means that finding Registered Care Home Managers, especially nurses, is a key issue - nearly 10% of posts were vacant at the time the data was collected; and
  • We also still have progress to make on ensuring the whole care worker workforce is qualified. The NMDS-SC shows that 50% of the workforce in Torbay hold a relevant adult social care qualification (50% in South West and 57% in England).Of those workers without a relevant adult social care qualification recorded, 16% had five or more years’ experience in their current role and 34% had completed either an induction or the Care Certificate.

Torbay is an active member of the Proud to Care South West campaign which aims to assist providers by promoting care as a positive career choice. 

The estimated number of adult social care jobs in the Torbay area in 2015/16 was 4,800, this included 400 managerial roles, 200 regulated professionals, 3,600 direct care (including 2,800 care workers), and 700 other-non-care providing roles.

Approximately half (46%) of the workforce worked on a full-time basis, 38% were part-time and the remaining 16% had no fixed hours. Around a fifth (22%) of the workforce were recorded as being on zero-hours contracts (17% in the South West and 24% England).

The average number of sickness days taken in the past year was 4.3 (5.4 in the South West and 5.2 across England). With an estimated workforce of 4,800 this would mean Torbay lost approximately 20,700 days to sickness in the last year.

The majority (82%) of the workforce in Torbay were female and the average age of 43 years old. Those aged 24 and under represented 11% of the workforce and those aged over 55 represented 25%, therefore approximately 1,200 people may retire in the next 10 years.

Around 89% of the workforce in Torbay were British, 6% were from within the EU and 4% from outside the EU, therefore there was a similar reliance on both EU and non-EU workers. Nationality varied by region, in England 83% of the workforce were British, in South West this was 86%.

Around 94% of the workforce in Torbay were of white ethnicity and 6% were from Black, Asian or Minority ethnic groups. In South West, 92% were of white ethnicity and 8% were of BAME groups and in England 80% were of white ethnicity and 20% were of BAME groups.

Skills for Care estimates that the starters’ rate in the past 12 months was 34.5%, (38.3% in South West and 35.0% in England). Of new starters, approximately two thirds (62%) were recruited from within the adult social care sector; therefore the sector retains their skills and experience.

The turnover rate of directly employed staff was 22.2%; this means approximately 1,050 leavers per year. This turnover rate was lower than the region average, at 30.0% and lower than England at 27.3%.

Adult social care has an experienced ‘core’ of workers. Workers in Torbay had on average 9.1 years of experience in the sector and around 74% of the workforce had been working in the sector for at least three years.

Skills for Care estimates that in Torbay, 2.0% of roles in adult social care were vacant; this gives an average of approximately 100 vacancies at any one time. This vacancy rate was lower than the region average, at 7.4% and lower than England at 7.3%.

The NMDS-SC shows that 50% of the workforce in Torbay hold a relevant adult social care qualification (50% in South West and 57% in England).

Of those workers without a relevant adult social care qualification recorded, 16% had five or more years’ experience in their current role and 34% had completed either an induction or the Care Certificate.

37.3% of care workers started in their current role over the previous 12 months in Torbay.

From this we estimate that in total there were around 1,100 care workers starting a new position over the past year across the whole sector. This starter rate was lower than the average across the South West area (43.5%).

During the same period, the NMDS-SC shows 24.0% of care workers left their role in Torbay.

From this we estimate that, across the adult social care sector, around 700 left their role in past 12 months.

This turnover rate was lower than the average across the South West area (33.6%).

As at December 2015, the average pay across Torbay for a registered manager was £27,300, which was similar to the average for the South West region (£29,000).

As at December 2015, there were 121 regulated care providers in Torbay and 102 registered managers. Some were responsible for more than one location and some locations had a vacant post.

As at December 2015, we estimate that the registered manager turnover rate in Torbay to be 19.0%. This turnover rate was lower than the average across the South West region which was 21.9%.

As at December 2015 there were 12 vacant positions for a registered manager in Torbay, which equated to a vacancy rate of 9.9%. This rate was similar to the average for the South West region (11.8%).  

For those regulated care providers that had a vacant post for a registered manager, 1in 4 were vacant for between 1 and 6 months, and 7 had been vacant for more than 6 months.

As at November 2015, we estimate that the starter rate for registered managers in Torbay to be 18.8%.

This start rate was lower than the average for the South West region which was 21.1%.

This is a regional initiative which started in 2017/18 and it is hoped that the success of the campaign in the first year will ensure commitment from public, independent and voluntary organisations to see its continuation in future years. The aim is to raise the profile, value and opportunities that exist within health, care and support across the south west. It will support the development of care awareness and appreciation in: paid care, unpaid care; and community awareness.

For providers in-particular, it will encourage retention of the workforce through people feeling increasingly valued and appreciated, being drawn to care as a rewarding role and career. The campaign will use many forms of media, to support the appreciation and development of the care market. It will draw directly on the experiences and stories of those involved and delivering it. 

It is not a recruitment portal. It is an awareness raising campaign that will support individual organisations or locality arranged recruitment initiatives. There will be the ability to signpost from the website for this campaign to those who chose to become involved in it.

For more information please see the Proud to Care South West website.